Working 9 to 5, or 6-4, or 10-8, or…

My dad says I should write a blog post about how many jobs I’ve had in the past six months, and he’s certainly had worse ideas – so here is a snapshot of six months in the working life of a zoologish (warning: does not contain much zoology).

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Tales From The Aquarium: Bay of Rays, Amazon River, & Coral Seas

Time for the second half of my virtual tour of the aquarium, covering the Bay of Rays, the Amazon River, and the Coral Seas.

Spot the leopard shark

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Tales from the Aquarium: Squid Dissection

I’ve recently had the opportunity to do some squid dissections for an audience of fascinated/horrified children and adults. Although we did do a squid dissection lab in my first or second year of University I’d long since forgotten the details, so it was quite fun to relearn these and share them with the public.

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Tales from the Aquarium: Sunken Ship and Bristol Harbourside

I recently started a job at Bristol Aquarium as a guest experience assistant, so I thought I’d take you on a virtual tour of the place, starting with the biggest tank in the aquarium, the natives tank.

I only wish real British shipwrecks had this kind of vis

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Review: ORCA Marine Mammal Surveyor Course

Where better to be on a cold rainy Saturday in November than at Plymouth University Marine Station, learning all about surveying for whales and dolphins! Clearly I’m not the only person who thought so anyway, as the room was packed with marine mammal surveyors to-be.

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A Note on Necessity (or An Ode to Honesty)

I realise that over the past few weeks I have been waiting until I have a ‘proper job’ or ‘something exciting’ sorted out before writing a post, but that actually goes against the ethos behind this blog. As we’re all aware, getting into research and conservation is incredibly challenging, and we all still need to earn money and have lives in the interim. So this is what mine looks like at the moment.

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Review: Research Assistant for Latin American Sea Turtles

I spent ten weeks as a research assistant for Latin American Sea Turtles (LAST) on their Osa In-Water Project. This is one of very few projects that aims to study sea turtles in their foraging environment rather than on nesting beaches (which only make up 2% of the life cycle, and where you can only study adult females and hatchlings). I worked with hawksbill, green and Pacific green turtles. The project also has a mangrove reforestation element, and aims to work with and within the local community.

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LAST Week Ten: Pura Vida!

Our last day off was spent swimming and sunbathing and generally being very lazy and soaking up the Costa Rican sun. Then it was time to say goodbye to our volunteer, with only a couple of days before we got to meet our replacement research assistants. Some toucans turned up in our papaya tree and the macaws seemed even more numerous than ever, just to remind of us of how incredible our home for the past ten weeks has been.

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LAST Week Nine: The Beginning of the End

We said goodbye to J a week ago, which really started to feel like the beginning of the end of our time here. This week we’ve had three pretty successful ocean days, including catching an adult male hawksbill to set our second satellite tracker on.

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LAST Week Eight: Satellites and Seagrass

This week has flown by, with a lot of new and different experiences including putting a satellite tracker on a turtle and an intense three-day seagrass survey.

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